Errata

Many thanks to readers who helped identify errors and improve the language used to describe certain issues and concepts in the February 2012 hardback edition. Below is a list of corrections made to that edition which are now reflected in the 2013 paperback edition. (Page numbers correspond to the original February 2012 edition.)

Consent of the Networked – Paperback corrections

p. xvi: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 45: “John Huntsman” => “Jon Huntsman”

p. 54: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 56: Nokia-Siemens => “Nokia Siemens” (no hyphen)

p. 57: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 60 (three times): “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 61: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 68 (twice): “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 76:

“Another act of legislation, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act, gives US companies immunity from being sued by their customers when they comply with blatantly illegal government surveillance requests directed at those customers. The result has been the use of corporate networks by the government to conduct illegal surveillance of US citizens—against which the American people have had little meaningful recourse.”

CHANGE TO

“Another act of legislation, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act, granted US companies immunity from being sued by their customers after having complied with blatantly illegal government surveillance of those customers. As a result the American people have had little meaningful recourse against illegal government surveillance of US citizens through corporate networks.”

p.77:

“After the New York Times first reported these revelations of illegal, warrantless wiretapping,”

CHANGE TO:

“After the New York Times first reported Tamm’s revelations of illegal, warrantless wiretapping,”

p.77:

“as a candidate, Senator Obama pledged to overturn the FISA Amendments Act and to reform the Patriot Act. President Obama apparently changed his mind or at least his willingness to act.”

CHANGE TO:

“as a candidate, Senator Obama initially pledged to reform the Patriot Act and overturn the FISA Amendments Act, then shortly before his election voted to extend the FISA Amendments Act. As President, Obama also appeared to have changed his mind – or at least his willingness to act – on reforming the Patriot Act.”

p. 78:

“which has not been updated since 1986”

CHANGE TO:

“which not been substantially revised since 1986”

p. 79:

“to do so with Internet communications”

CHANGE TO:

“to do so with Internet communications that are stored on third-party computer servers”

p.79:

“barred by a provision of the Patriot Act from informing customers about the existence of the NSL requests.”

CHANGE TO:

“barred by law from informing customers about the existence of the NSL requests.”

p. 79: “In 2009, a federal court finally ruled the Patriot Act’s gag provision, prohibiting disclosure of the very existence of the NSLs, to be unconstitutional.”

CHANGE TO:

“Later that year a federal court ruled the NSL statute unconstitutional as written, prompting Congress to amend the law, allowing recipients to challenge both the demands and the gag orders. Then in 2008 an appeals court ruled parts of the revised law unconstitutional as well, prompting further revisions requiring the government to prove that disclosure of a NSL would harm national security.”

p. 82: “US diplomatic cables, leaked by” => “US diplomatic cables, allegedly leaked by”

p. 82: “digital terrorist” => “high-tech terrorist”

p. 95 (twice): “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 95: delete first instance of “Netherlands”

p: 95:

AT THE END OF THE SENTENCE:

“Finland, Sweden, Denmark, and the Netherlands were the first countries in Europe to begin filtering content at the national level.”

INSERT:

“(although the Netherlands soon withdrew the policy in response to strong opposition).”

p. 121: “June 2011” => “April 2012”

p. 151:  “June 2009” => “June 2010”

p. 182: Nokia-Siemens => “Nokia Siemens” (no hyphen)

p. 191: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 209: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 211:

“The original IP address system was based on sequences of four numbers, known as IPv4. Nobody imagined when the Internet was created that those numbers would run out, but they did in 2011. Now the world’s entire technical community is managing a transition to a new system based on six numbers, called IPv6.”

CHANGE TO:

“The original system, called IPv4, provided roughly 4.3 billion unique numbers (less than the world’s population). Nobody imagined when the Internet was created that those numbers would run out, but they did in 2011. A global transition effort is now underway to replace the old system with a new IP addressing system, IPv6, with more than enough numbers for every molecule on earth.”

p. 247: Nokia-Siemens => “Nokia Siemens” (no hyphen)

p. 256: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 257: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 258: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 259: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 261: citations #79 and #81 are reversed.

SWITCH:

“Christopher Soghoian, “An End to Privacy Theater: Exposing and Discouraging Corporate Disclosure of User Data to the Government” (August 10, 2010), Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology, available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1656494.”

AND:

“Christopher Soghoian, “The Law Enforcement Surveillance Reporting Gap, April 10, 2011, http://ssrn .com/abstract=1806628.”

p. 278 (twice): “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 283: “Open Net” => OpenNet

p. 288: “John Huntsman” => “Jon Huntsman”

p. 290: Nokia-Siemens => “Nokia Siemens” (no hyphen)

p. 291: “Open Net” => OpenNet

 

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